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Should You Avoid Antiperspirants Containing Aluminium Salts?

Should You Avoid Antiperspirants Containing Aluminium Salts?

Should You Avoid Antiperspirants Containing Aluminium Salts?

Do you know what's in your antiperspirant? It could be harming your health!

Do you know what’s in your antiperspirant? It could be harming your health!

For a long time, people have been more careful about what they eat. Certain foods are toxic to the body, or are just unhealthy, and so people have been keeping a close eye on their diets. With recent revelations of dangerous chemicals in cosmetics and personal care products, more and more people are now exercising the same care about what they put on their bodies as what they put into it.

The fact is, it’s not necessary to overload personal care products such as body oil and antiperspirants with chemicals, as natural ingredients can be just as effective in caring for your skin. However, you may not be aware that – due to the presence of aluminium in the form of aluminium salts – your deodorant could actually be dangerous.

Aluminium salts such as aluminium hydroxychloride, aluminium chlorohydrate, aluminium zirconium and aluminium sulphate often figure prominently on the ingredients list of many well known high street brands of toiletries and cosmetics. Aluminium salts are most commonly encountered by the lay person as the active ingredients in antiperspirants, and they work by restricting the movement of sweat from the sweat glands to the skin surface, where it is likely to cause body odour.

On the face of it, aluminium would appear to be a safe, natural ingredient.  After all, it’s the third most abundant element on Earth, after oxygen and silicon. It’s present in soil and water, which means it finds its way into the food we eat and the water we drink. Usually, any aluminium that is orally absorbed into the body is later passed in the urine.

Some studies have identified a link between aluminium levels in the body and Alzheimer’s Disease.  This research is borne out by autopsies on people who died after the Camelford water poisoning incident in Cornwall in 1988, when large quantities of aluminium sulphate were accidentally introduced into the town’s water supply. Some of these people died from rare forms of dementia, and were found to have abnormally high levels of aluminium in their brains.

Other studies claim that the amount of aluminium absorbed by the body from antiperspirants and deodorants is minimal compared to that in food and drink. However, there is enough of a question mark over the ingredient to make intelligent people wonder why aluminium salts are used in products at all when their safety cannot be guaranteed.

It is known that aluminium from underarm deodorants can also find its way into the urine, so clearly the salts can be absorbed through the skin. Given that some research also identifies a link between aluminium and breast cancer, that’s double the cause for concern.

Manufacturers describe aluminium salts as ‘a safe and effective method of controlling sweat.’ However, one has to wonder how something that interferes with the body’s natural temperature regulation system can ever be described as ‘safe.’

The real problem is that the aluminium in antiperspirants comes into direct contact with the skin, and remains there until you wash it off. And with antiperspirants containing up to 25% of aluminium salts, that’s a lot of chemicals lying on your skin.

Because aluminium-containing antiperspirants mess with the body’s natural processes, they are effectively drugs, yet manufacturers fail to point this out to consumers. Then there’s the obvious point that if sweat is blocked off from escaping in one area – the armpits – it will have to find another outlet. So all that happens is that the problem is moved around the body, rather than being solved altogether. Sweating doesn’t only cool you down, it also allows waste products to exit the body, and again, these efficient aluminium containing antiperspirants prevent this natural process.

The fact is that despite all the recent studies, nobody can say with certainty that aluminium does not have long term detrimental effects on the body. And some people can have a bad reaction to aluminium-containing antiperspirants – otherwise why would manufacturers feel the need to warn people to discontinue use if they notice irritation when using the products?

The real problem is that the aluminium in antiperspirants comes into direct contact with the skin, and remains there until you wash it off. And with antiperspirants containing up to 25% of aluminium salts, that’s a lot of chemicals lying on your skin.

Because of this uncertainty over the long term effects of chemicals on the body, Naturally Mediterranean uses only 100% natural ingredients in its skin care range. You will find no harmful chemicals in any of their products – just top quality natural ingredients, locally sourced in the Mediterranean region to be safe on your skin.

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